Pressure Groups and Inter-Governmental Organizations

Conference on Pressure Groups and Inter-Governmental Organizations

Organizers: Christina Davis (Princeton University) and Tana Johnson (Duke University)

October 20-21, 2017
(By invitation only)

Location

Wallace Hall, Room 300
Princeton University

Friday, October 20

8:30–9:00am

Breakfast

9:00–9:15am

Welcome and Introductions 

9:15–10:45am

Panel 1 - Pressure Groups and Trade Negotiations

 

9:15-10:00am

10:00-10:45am

 

Chair: Allison Carnegie

Judith Goldstein and Robert Gulotty Negotiating the 1947 GATT

Ryan Brutger “Litigation for Sale: Private Firms and WTO Dispute Escalation

Discussant:
Megumi Naoi 

10:45–11:00am

Break

11:00am-12:15pm 

Panel 2 - Pressure Groups and Courts

 

11:00-11:45am

11:45am-12:15pm

Chair: Megumi Naoi

Stephen Chaudoin “International Law in Real Time: The Philippines' War on Drugs" 

Rachel Cichowski “Legal Mobilization and International Litigation: The Neglected Role of Organizations before International Courts” 

Discussant:
Allison Carnegie

12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:30-3:00pm

Panel 3 - IGOs Seeking Engagement with Pressure Groups

 

1:30-2:15pm                                      

2:15-3:00pm

Chair: Jonas Tallberg

Michele Griffin "The Exercise of Influence: The Secretary-General and Decision-Making at the United Nations" 

Tana Johnson "The Adhocracy: Permeation of Global Governance by Pressure Groups"

Discussant:
Hans Peter Schmitz

3:00-3:15pm

Break

3:15-4:45pm

Panel 4 - Pressure Groups Seeking Engagement with IGOs

 

3:15-4:00pm .                                      

4:00-4:45pm

Chair: Kerstin Martens

Marcel Hanegraaff and Jan Beyers "Should I Stay or Should I Go: Does Increased Non-State Actor Activity Reinforce More Inequality in Global Environmental Governance"

Jennifer Hadden and Lorien Jasny When Do Organizations Cooperate? Homophily and Risk in the Climate Change Advocacy Network 

Discussant:
Jonas Tallberg

4:45-5:30pm

Group Discussion/Debrief: Who and Why

Chairs: Christina Davis and Tana Johnson

Who:

Which specific pressure groups opt for direct involvement with IGOs, rather than only working indirectly through states?

Overall, which kinds of pressure groups (e.g., corporations, NGOs, technical communities) are more likely to opt for direct involvement? 

And overall, which kinds of IGOs attract direct involvement by pressure groups?

Why:

What patterns emerge concerning pressure groups, IGOs, geographic locations, issue areas, etc.? 

To what extent are pressure groups pushing their way into IGOs, and to what extent are IGOs seeking out pressure groups? 

What does this tell us about why these relationships occur and vary?

 

 

Saturday, October 21

8:30-9:00am

Breakfast

9:00-10:30am

Panel 5 - The Language of Engagement

 

9:00-9:45am                                    

9:45-10:30am

Chair: Hans Peter Schmitz

Ann Marie Clark The Justice Politics of Rights: NGO-IGO Links in Human Rights and Global Development Advocacy

Ethan Kapstein Governing the Global Land Grab

Discussant:
Nikhar Gaikwad

10:30-10:45am

Break

10:45am-12:15pm

Panel 6 - The Logistics of Engagement

 

10:45-11:30am                                

11:30am-12:15pm

Chair: Nikhar Gaikwad

Sarah Stroup "How Authority Shapes Cooperation with NGOs: EU Funding in the Humanitarian Sector” 

Elizabeth Bloodgood "Divided Loyalties? Patterns of Interest Group Involvement in IGOs"

Discussant:
Kerstin Martens

12:15-12:45pm

Group Discussion/Debrief: How

Chairs: Christina Davis and Tana Johnson

How:

What form does pressure groups’ direct involvement with IGOs take (e.g., testifying at meetings, submitting drafts of treaty language, picketing outside headquarters)? 

In addition to formal visible forms such as observer accreditation, what are the less formal or less visible means of involvement?

12:45-1:45pm

Lunch and Departures